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My Home Renovation: Dining in Style

Posted on: May 29th, 2017 by Decorate26.

In a world where open plan living has become very popular, I am still a fan of separate spaces for Dining, Lounge, Kitchen etc… Call me old fashioned, but there is something special about walking into a room that has been dressed for a purpose as opposed to having everything revealed at once. Having said that my own home represents the perfect middle ground with the Dining Room partially open-plan and visible from the Formal Living Room, and visa versa. It is a style that fits perfectly within both a time gone by and today’s brief for the modern family.

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Looking into the Dining Room from the Formal Living Room.

Elegance is an overriding consideration in this space, but resides under an eclectic umbrella. Mixing stylistic elements has always been a strength of mine and a facet of interior design that has become part of my signature style. I relish the opportunity to create a room with unexpected elements which when viewed together work seamlessly together, creating a successful scheme. You will find then that Georgian and French Antiques reside quite happily alongside accessories from the 1950’s and 1960’s, as well as textiles and furniture that have been designed in the 21st Century.




Often time, clients are wary about placing rugs and other floor coverings under dining tables. There is no denying that a little more care will be required if choosing to layer and ground your dining table setting, however choosing a rug that has properties that are better able to deal with the situation in which it will be placed is one way to minimise the stress of caring for your rug. There are synthetic rugs on the market now that are almost fool proof, however if you prefer a natural fibre such as I did in this space, choosing something that is 100% wool for example, would be a good choice. The natural oils within ¬†wool act as a natural guard against soiling. Other than an annual professional clean it still looks fabulous and hasn’t added any more work than you would expect from a room that is carpeted. Besides the practical considerations of using a rug, or similar, what the colour and pattern of a rug will do to the appeal of a space can be incredible and well worth the extra care.

The beauty and appeal of a gorgeous looking rug.

Lighting has an important presence in this Dining Room project. Table lamps, candles, a candelabra and a chandelier all have a place and purpose in this space. Any number of lights can be used at any one time for example, the chandelier with a dimmer is used for both task lighting and when dimmed, ambience. The table lamp is lit to draw the eye to the space where it sits, whilst the design of the ‘etch’ tea lights reflects throughout the room when they are lit. Lighting is not only used as a practical tool, but also to provide drama and ambience to this space. Nothing is left unnoticed.



Lighting, spacial planning, the practical vs the theatrical, displaying treasured pieces all of these need to be considered in a dining room. You might have noticed one aspect of interior design that I haven’t mentioned is window treatments, to dress or not to dress? In this room the view out to the pool is stunning and looking at the water gives a great sense of calm. Any opportunity to make the most of aspects that promote a soothing aesthetic can never be underestimated. After all, how a room translates the feel good factor onto the people who live in the space is very much about what you choose to project, highlight and maximise. There is a trade off however, in not having window treatments particularly in the winter, and that is a loss of heat. I would like to counteract this by adding fabric roller blinds in a pop of pattern and colour, of course! The maximalist in me will not be quiet otherwise! The roller blind will sit neatly within the frame of the french doors which when rolled up will be out of sight, but at night have the ability to be drawn to retain any heat generated during the day. The perfect solution, and I’ll look no further than Florence Broadhurst’s ‘Circle and Squares’ in yellow!

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Source: Decorate26